Trip Report: Bagels to Burritos - Gunks Edition

photo 2Trip Report: Bagels to Burritos

Part 1, Gunks Edition

By Maxine Speier

The Shawangunk ridge, or the “Gunks,” rises 200 feet above the tree line. The exposed cliffs stretch across the horizon, a swath of white-grey rock. When we are there in early September, most of the trees are still a lush and vibrant green, but within a few weeks, as temperatures drop, the leaves will change to golden yellows and reds and the Hudson Valley will be transformed.

Fall is the best time to climb in the Gunks, while the days are growing shorter, before the first snow comes. Summer’s humidity has lifted and a dry coolness sets in. Leaves crunch underfoot, but the rock is not numbingly cold yet.

Jeff and I drive into New Paltz in the late afternoon. It is the first stop on our road trip, a trip that took shape back in San Francisco, where the two of us (both native New Yorkers) wandered up and down steep hills, eating tightly rolled food truck burritos, talking about the correct way to cook a bagel, and waxing nostalgic for the vibrant change of seasons—the humid summer heat-waves and the winters where the snow is too deep to shovel.

Jeff is a full time route-setter for Touchstone who moved to California from a small town in upstate New York over three years ago. I moved from Brooklyn exactly a year ago. The trip was initially intended as a chance to visit home and see our families, but the more we talk and plan, the more it becomes clear that if we’re going to take any time off from work, it’s going to be to go climbing.

photo 1New Paltz, a bustling college town filled with students, climbers, and retired hippies, was founded in the 1600s and lies just east of the Gunks. The prominent cliff line is visible from the main street of town.

“There it is! There it is!” I’m giddy with proximity as I look out at it. Both Jeff and I have been to the Gunks before; it’s where he learned to trad climb when he was an engineering student years before, and it’s where I led groups on hiking trips for my college Outing Club (before I’d ever considered trying to climb).


The familiarity of the ridgeline is a relief. Any trip home is filled with so many little inconsistencies: new businesses that have sprung up, neighbors who have moved away, old-hangouts that have lost their luster, even the faces of close friends and family reflect the time that has passed. But the view of the Gunks is the same as I remember it.

We pop into the local gear shop, Rock and Snow, to pick up some last minute slings and rent a helmet for Jeff, who left his back in California. At the entrance to the shop is a row of cabinets filled with climbing relics. Arranged chronologically, the gear in the cabinets shows the evolution of climbing: pitons, chocks, hexes, cams, different styles of shoes, and rappel devices. The older gear is both impressive and terrifying; it serves as a reminder of how far the sport of climbing has come, and how much creativity and thought have gone into preserving the spaces and the knowledge of a crag.
 

photo 5That first afternoon, with just enough daylight for one climb, we drive from New Paltz to the Trapps parking lot. The Gunks is located in the Mohonk Preserve, a 6500-acre network of fields, hiking trails, and old carriage roads. The Preserve is a non-profit organization founded in 1963 to protect the land and to enter you must either pay a day fee ($17 for climbers) or get an annual pass ($55).

Photo 4The Trapps is the most popular climbing area on the ridge, and the parking lot gets extremely crowded on weekends. Climbers drive up from New York City (just two hours away) and will sleep in their cars just to be the first on the cliffs. Luckily, we’re there in the middle of the week, and though we see plenty of other climbers, we don’t have to compete for parking. From the parking lot, it is just a quick walk up to the carriage road that runs along the base of the cliff.

Following the flat, gravelly carriage road, you can access roughly 500 routes, as well as some truly excellent bouldering. It is easy to hike to the top of the ridge and set up topropes for some of the climbs, but the Gunks is most famous for its multi-pitch trad routes. Formed of hard quartz conglomerate, the rock features long horizontal striations and cracks. As we walk down the road, Jeff keeps his eyes on the cliffs, looking out for the famous High Exposure (5.6) arête.

High E is a 250-foot, two-pitch climb that has consistently been called the greatest 5.6 in the world since it was first climbed in 1941: a Classic (with a capital C) in an area jam-packed with classics. Having left the guidebook behind, Jeff relies on his memory to find the start. “I think this is the line,” he says and with that he’s off. The first pitch is a straightforward climb up the left of the arête, to a spacious belay ledge. As I follow him, I spot plenty of opportunities to place gear, which is what makes this region so exceptional for people learning to lead trad. Heading up, you can high-step from one horizontal crack to another, finding secure footing and holds as you go, and placing as much protection as you want.

The second pitch of the climb is what everyone raves about. You breathe, step up to the corner of the ledge, and reach for a jug just out of sight to pull yourself up over a roof. As you find your way on the arête, there is air all around you, and the name of the climb clicks in your mind: this is definitely high exposure.

Photo 3Climbing in the Gunks is beautiful. It is simple, and straightforward, and stunning. The rock is beautiful. The turkey buzzards and hawks that whoosh their wings overhead are beautiful. The trees beneath you are beautiful. And the view that opens up, of forests and fields that stretch out into the distance, is beautiful. Standing up on the expansive belay ledge after the first pitch of High E, you find the kind of beauty you want to soak in and store for later, to draw on when you are stuck in traffic, or having a bad day at work. You want to hold onto the memory of the landscape, and of the rock beneath your fingers.

Over the next two days, as we walk up and down the carriage road, picking out climbs and taking our time on them, as I follow and then finally lead my first trad pitch, and as we hike out with our headlamps each night, I continue to find an exhilarating serenity in the Gunks. This seems like it should be an oxymoron, but is the truth. There is a dizzying, breathless rush to these climbs, even the 5.5s and 5.6s. But there is also a peaceful quietude in the Gunks. The rock looks and feels timeless, and for a few moments, you are a part of that.

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THE END

 

 

Keys for Staying on Your Feet: Slab Secrets Revealed

Technique is for the weak. Or so seems when you see the footloose climbing in the gym. Unfortunately, big muscles and an ability to campus do little on harder routes. Precise footwork and an ability to climb well will get you much farther. One of the best ways to improve your footwork is to slab climb. While climbing lower angle rocks isn't in vogue, it can be really really fun. Take the time to learn proper technique and the steep routes will be easier with your precise footwork.

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James Lucas tries hard to keep from skinning his knee while slab climbing in Squamish

Position your body

You want as much downward pressure on the balls of your feet as possible. Leaning too far into the wall may lead to sliding right down the rock.  Keep your butt out and your hands in front of you. This style burns your calves but offers the best position.  

Smear your feet

Use the friction between your shoes and the rock to hold you in place. Get as much weight onto your foot as possible. Look for tiny edges, ripples and other dimples in the rock. The smallest wrinkles can be an excellent place to smear your foot and make some upward progress."Trust the rubber because the rubber is way better than it was in the 70s,"  said master slab climber Hayden Kennedy.

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Jon Gleason climbs Xenith Dance in Squamish, a classic 5.10c slab route behind the campground

Move Confidently

Moving well on slab routes requires stepping up. Usually the moves aren't physically taxing but require intense balance. Place your foot on a hold and commit to the process, shifting your weight over and then onto your foot quickly. Slabs become easier when you move confidently. "For me it helps looking to your left and right and try to stand up as straight as possible," said El Cap free climber Lucho Rivera. "Always remember to stand on your feet and don't overgrip. Its easy to do on slabs. And relax if possible, tho sometimes thats a hard one."

"Be stoked to go for it even if you're going to fail." said Kennedy. Having confidence and a willingness to be bold helps with the difficult mental game of slab climbing. Slab climbing becomes easier when you climb fast and confidently.  Also, Remember that slabs are way easier in the shade.

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Kevin Daniels moving quickly on Dancing in the Light, one of the test piece slab routes in Squamish.


Wear Good Shoes

Stiffer shoes work much better on slabs. Make sure your soles are clean. Slab climbing requires strong feet and solid calves. After intense slab climbing, some climbers complain of sore feet. Stiff shoes help alleviate this problem and make standing on small edges easier. Check out a good pair of TC Pros for really tough slabs.

There's lots of great places to go get your slab climb on. Try the Dike Route (5.9) in Tuolumne, FreeBlast (5.11b) in Yosemite, or Initial Friction (v1) and Blue Suede Shoes (v5) in the Camp 4 boulders. There's amazing slab routes in Squamish as well. At Ironworks, there's a great slab in the back of the gym as well as a wall in the front.

Routes Comp at LA Boulders a Huge Hit

In the 9 months since LA Boulders opened in Downtown Los Angeles, it has become a home away from home for many Southern California climbers. "LA Boulders is definitely the best climbing gym for bouldering. I would recommend this gym to anyone who is looking for a great workout and wants to challenge themselves. The gym has a great community feel with people who are ready to help you and encourage you." Said Cammie, a climber who lives in Long Beach.

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But one of the biggest perks of the gym is the fun atmosphere that the staff works hard to create. "Our members have been requesting more comps, and we're really into spoiling them with fun events," said LA.B manager Remi Moehring. "I asked our setting foreman, Noah, what kind of event he wanted to be involved in since he would have to be the creative genius behind it. He suggested a themed route comp, thus Pump Up The Jam was born. And it was good."

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The comp, which was free for members and the price of a day pass for guests, involved routes for all levels of climbers. Over 130 climbers spent their Friday night at the LA.B, enjoying extra long routes and feeling the burn! "The event went even better than we could have expected," said Moehring. "It had the psych factor and awesome prizes of a major competition with the community feel and food of your really popular friend's Birthday party, plus beer, minus having to bring a present. Everyone had fun and the crowd was encouraging of other climbers no matter what the skill level, which is what the LA.B community is all about."

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For info about upcoming events at LA Boulders and other Touchstone Climbing Gyms, be sure to follow them on Facebook or Instagram! So see the whole gallery, click here

 

Better Know a Setter: Eric Sanchez

They're up with the sun, chain coffee-drinking and working hard to bring you the routes you love to send, project, and crush. 'Touchstone Routesetting' is an industry term for excellence, and each member of the crew brings a little somethin' somethin' to the team. In our ongoing segment, Better Know a Setter, we bring you a closer look at what makes 'em tick. In this weeks installment, we sat down with a Touchstone institution, Eric 'McLuvin' Sanchez. 

How long have you been route setting?

I think in total I have been setting for 6 years, 3 of which is setting for Touchstone.

How did you get into route setting?

I set for 3 years at my home gym, the late Sunrise Rock Gym in Livermore before I started started setting for Touchstone. I grew up doing the youth competitive competitions and from there it was only natural for me to try to set myself something fun to climb in Livermore. Once I graduated high school I started working full time for Touchstone and it grew into something that I always want to do.

20223 416055285129387 126037191 nWhat is your favorite gym to set at and why?

My favorite gym has to be the LA.B for bouldering, because they have the best hold selection and the walls are great. For ropes it has to be the Mission Cliffs expansion. The angle of the main wall is perfect for a fun gymnastic climb.

What are you route setting pet peeves?

If you ask anyone on the crew the would probably say my biggest pet peeve is bad tape angles, which I hate, but I think someone setting the same sequences constantly is something that bothers me a little bit more.

What is in your route setting bag right now?

Crap… I don’t even know where it is...

What inspires your routes?

Competitions, videos of other gyms setting, and learning from what the more experienced setters do inspires my routes. I tend to like the climbs that break from the ladder mold and have a good aesthetic quality.

What is your favorite memory setting with the Touchstone Crew?

It has to be setting Divisionals at Mission Cliffs with Jonathan, Jeremy, and two PG setters. I learned more about route setting in that one week than all my other setting experiences combined. It was really great to see 9 year old girls crushing my finals route, which I think I fell on.

Where is your favorite place to climb outside?

Mortar. Definitely Mortar. Mortar Rock is one of the best climbing areas I have ever been to, anyone who says differently is a hater. Yosemite is pretty good too, if your into that type of thing.

What is your advice for aspiring setters?

Just go to as many gyms as possible and look at what the setters are doing at each one, there is no better way to learn how to set.

How many McNuggets do you eat everyday?

Roughly 40.

How many cups of coffee?

At least one pot to leave the house, two when I get to work, and two more at lunch. And then usually one or two more to make sure I’m awake for the drive home.

 

Dreams of White Porsches - 5.13b - Eric Sanchez from Alton Richardson on Vimeo.

American Ninja Warrior Training at DRG

American Ninja Warrior, the popular TV show, has shown that climbers have got what it takes to make it to Mt Moriyama. With their grip strength, core, and body tension - climbers have dominated in this fast paced competition. Did you know that one of the warriors this season trained at Diablo Rock Gym in Concord? Alan Connealy has competed in seasons 3, 4, 5 and 6 of American Ninja Warrior. In season 3, he made it to the boot camp version of the show and in season 4 and 6, he qualified for and competed in Las Vegas.

 

Alan had this to say about his experience at DRG: "As a competitor on ANW the last 4 seasons, I have experimented with many things to help with my training, I even built my own parkour gym. A big piece to my training is grip strength. Climbing at Diablo Rock Gym was awesome for grip training! I felt like every time I make it to the gym, a new challenge awaited me. The campus board was awesome for grip training, and the slack line was perfect for balance work."

If you're an ANW junkie, the climbing gym might be just the place to start your training! 

 

 

Chalk, Tape, and Rubber

Why I Climb

By Marie Schwindler

unnamed-12It is a warm summer night, and the air tastes slightly of chalk. I stare at my hands after attempting one of my projects at the gym. No use in asking me how many times I have attempted to send this problem because I've lost count. Damn! Another flapper! Well, that's why tape is one of the next best things to chalk. I find myself here at the gym for the third time this week, and it's only Tuesday. Knowing that if I don't come at least another four times this week, chances are, I'll probably be twitching through out the weekend. I promised my partner that we would spend the weekend together. Even though I love them deeply, I yearn to climb. It's already August, and there may be only two more months to attempt the route that I've been working on since last summer. My climbing partner and I have visited the route multiple times this season. With each visit, we come back with the feeling of achievement throbbing on our fingertips. We've already come so far!

Thing is, this isn't my first project, and well, it won't be my last. I go through months where I am almost completely consumed with climbing. At times I have felt like I am almost living in two separate worlds. After a productive weekend of climbing, I've been known to show up to work with bruises, scrapes, cuts on my hands, and dirt deeply embedded under my fingernails even though I swear I've washed them. My co-workers don't seem to appreciate the epic achievements that I rave about, nor the trials that I have overcome as I climbed and clawed my way up the rock. They say things like, "You're crazy!" or "Is that what you consider a vacation!?"

unnamed-11Truth is, I can't imagine any other way to spend my free time. Contemplating on such comments, this question seemed to arise, "What is it about climbing that has me so captivated?" After meditating on this question for some time, I concluded on this. When I climb, I feel a sense of focus. On the wall, I don't think about work, the laundry, or about what waits for me at home. Rather, I find my mind consumed with what my next move or gear placement will be. With rock climbing, I push my body and my mind to places that would be hard to achieve in the security of my sheltered metropolitan life. Thus, it also offers me the beauty of adventure and insight to my own determination. And of course, how can I not mention the view, the air, and tranquility of the mountains that comes with such adventures!

Through being challenged with this self posed question, I found that my perception of climbing took on a slightly different form. All those nights at the gym, all the minor deformities that come with cramming your foot into a shoe that is obviously too small, all the falls, the takes, and days of being so completely shut down, it all just seemed so rightfully justified. Through this understanding, my love for climbing only expands. So, when the seasons turn, and it gets cold and rainy, and the mountains that I love so deeply are kissed with snow, you will find me at the gym (often).

There, with my community, we climb, and push ourselves for the preparation of next season.

Mock Leading: Prepping to Climb 5.13d X

Climbing traditional routes can be terrifying. Will the gear hold? Will you be able to do the moves? Breaking into a different style of climbing can be quite hard. One of the best ways to get into traditional climbing is to mock lead. While this may seem like an elementary climbing skill, it's still used by the best climbers.

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Sonnie makes the crux move on Gunslinger (5.13d R)

A few days ago, traditional climbing guru Sonnie Trotter made the third ascent of Gunslinger, a 5.13d R route at Murrin Park in Squamish. While solid cams protect the crux of the route, the moves to the anchor involve a difficult deadpoint and a potential for hitting the ground. Trotter employed mock leading tactics to make the ascent happen.

The first step to climbing the scary traditional route involved hiking around to the top of the cliff and setting up a toprope. Sonnie wired the moves on toprope, figuring out the difficult sequence, where he needed to rest and the best way to hold the rock.

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Sonnie preps for the mock lead by wearing all the necessary gear including a kneepad and helmet.

He lowered down the route and inspected the crack for possible places for protection. Making a mental note of where and how he would place gear, he prepared for a mock lead of the route. He climbed the route on toprope with another rope attached. He placed the gear and clipped the rope into the protection, checking the rope drag, how the pro would go in and what he would hold on to while he placed the gear. He even pretended to get short roped to simulate the experience.

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Sonnie nears the top, where the action is.

After a rest day, Sonnie returned to the difficult route. He padded the base with a dozen crashpads in case he fell on the final difficult move. He didn’t want to hit the ground and ruin his career as Canada’s best looking climbing. When he finally led the route, he made a flawless ascent, placing the gear well and executing the moves for a great ascent of the route.

 

Member of the Month: Phil Buerk

Oh boy, have I got a story for you! I love that each month I get the opportunity to introduce the readers to someone that I feel is an integral part of our community. I have had the pleasure of knowing Phil Buerk for a number of years now. I am constantly impressed by his accomplishments and grateful for the gift of his friendship. He is (in no particular order) a father, husband, gardener, chef, music & art aficionado, creator, designer, art director, and all-around great guy! You will find yourself in his presence one day, and realize what a treasure he is to have around. For now, I will let you read some of his story...in his own words. Enjoy!

phil.1Member of the Month: Phil Buerk

Bove) I am so excited about this interview; I don’t know where to begin. How long have you been in Sacramento, and what keeps you here?

Phil Buerk) We’ve been in Sacramento for almost 13 years and enjoy the people, the trees, and the definite seasons as opposed to same season Southern California.

B) My meeting you was largely due to your wife, Linda Wagner, who works as a yoga instructor here at Sacramento Pipeworks. Her Anusara style class takes place a couple of times a week, and is inspirational to many attendees (including myself). Can you tell us how you two met, and is yoga a part of your daily routine?

PB) Linda and I met through our work in advertising and graphic design. She was a professional photographer, and I was a designer/art director. We met while we were on an assignment. I did learn yoga while we were in Japan and enjoy it still as I am able, but walking has always been my thing...when Linda taught at a studio near Land Park I used to walk 5.3 miles during her 1.5 hr Saturday A.M. class. I do miss that.

B) Do you have family that live in the area, and if not, where are they residing now?

PB) I have an older sister living in the East Bay area and 3 children and 3 grandchildren (from my 1st marriage) live in Southern California, New York, and New Hampshire.

B) As we know, California is a hotbed for gardening and farming. I have learned over the years that you have been quite an advocate of sustaining a garden of your own to grow crops to feed yourself and your family. Is there a particular vegetable that you would recommend we plant here in Sacramento that is both easy to care for, and delicious to consume?

PB) We have had good luck with summer squash, strawberries, peppers, cucumbers, eggplant and tomatoes grown in raised beds, with minimal drip irrigation.

phil.2B) Like many of us, Walt Disney has had a large effect on my upbringing and life. Can you tell us about your experience working with such a diverse company?

PB) My Disney history dates way back to high school. My senior year, I volunteered to help decorate the floats for the Pasadena Rose Parade, and that particular year the parade theme happened to be Disney. So, almost every participant had at least one Disney character on their float. I ran into a Disney creative director who found out I was creative. He asked me to help him run a team of adults who, along with him, would do all the faces of each Disney character (because they had to be spot-on correct or Walt would not agree to allow them to be used). Our team covered each and every character face out of rose petals to get the skin colors, as well as the expression just right. I guess the Disney guy liked my abilities, because he invited me to meet with him at the studio, which I did, and toured the set of 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea. He offered me a job when I graduated. If I had taken that job, I’d probably be a millionaire by now from all the stock splits and bonuses! 30 years (or so) later, successfully spent in advertising, I was hired by Disney to head up their Asia Pacific Creative Department in Hong Kong. After 2 years of establishing that, I moved to Tokyo to be Creative Director of Walt Disney/Japan. There, I headed up a group of 42 character artists, illustrators, and designers (most of which had been trained at Disney, US), and many of which were bi-lingual. It turned out to be the best job I ever had--the most fun, most interesting, and most challenging way I can imagine to wrap up a creative career!

B) Do you have a favorite Disney character/creation, and why do you find them to be so intriguing?

PB) Oh yeah, I do! Bambi, of course, and Dumbo (‘cause I had big ears as a boy too). But, my favorite was Jiminy Cricket (he was Pinocchio's conscience) and I guess he sort of became mine, along with my paternal Grandmother who looks down on me from on high.

B) I know that you enjoy music, and find ways to weave it into your daily life. Are there any particular genres of music that you are consistently drawn to?

PB) I love classical music, jazz, some rocky top, and some western and mountain music. I’m still drawn to 50s modern jazz, Brubeck, etc., and some contemporary folks too, like Sting etc. But, I always seem to go back to the classical for real enjoyment!

phil.3B) If there were a major shift we could make as a civilization in regards to new technology, which way would you like to see the changes go? Why?

PB) Part of me thinks that we may have come too far, too fast. While society loves the instant gratification, I’m not sure any of us is prepared for the eventual colossal cost of what we have lost. I long for simplicity in life, and I think that’s one reason why I like cooking. It’s “hands on”, requires simple concentration, creativity, decisions, and proven methods, and you get to eat the results. Bingo!

B) Do you have a favorite artist or illustrator? What do you enjoy most about their work?

PB) I like Andrew Wyeth’s work and most of the Impressionist Artists and Sculptors. Probably as a result of being in-and-around advertising and design for much of my life, I also enjoy American illustrators such as Norman Rockwell (and too many others to mention). Most of these artists speak to me on such a personal level that I feel as though I knew them. I usually have a good time in a decent museum, like the Crocker.

B) If you could be any cartoon character, what would you be and why?

PB) Probably Donald Duck, because he is so irascible, and some days I can really get behind that. Know what I mean?

Bag of Tricks for Climbing

Half of the time, granite climbing stumps me. The other half of the time, I’m unsure what to do. Despite spending years climbing in Yosemite, Squamish, Index, Tahoe and granite crags across the US, I am almost always perplexed by the best method to climb the features. The main lesson I’ve learned in granite is to make sure to have a huge arsenal of tricks. Here’s a few ideas for how to approach different climbing.

Stem Corners:

Corners offer some of the coolest climbing around and unbelievable aesthetics. Stemming provides the best way to climb these features. Paste your feet against the walls, trust the rubber and use your palms to slowly move your feet up the wall. Unfortunately, I’m horrible at stemming. I have the flexibility of a steel girder. Granite master, Tommy Caldwell developed a technique to beat the calf pump of stemming. Caldwell climbs the corners like a chimney, putting his back against one side and feet against the other. Though more physical than stemming, the technique saves your calves and can be easier. Numerous difficult crack climbs have fallen to the advanced chimney tactic including Book of Hate (5.13d).

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Walker Emerson stemming on the Shadow in Squamish (5.13-)

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Vancouverite Allen Roberts chimneying the same section that Walker stemmed.

Offwidths:

Is that crack too wide? Are you struggling to get inside? Beat the offwidth dance by laybacking the feature. Climb faster by pasting your feet against the wall and hurdling up the rock. Just be extremely careful doing this. I have core shot my rope twice laybacking and falling out of the Harding Slot and then on the Scotty Burke offwidth on El Capitan. Yikes! Laybacking can be hard to place gear as well. Be sareful and think about toproping if you want to layback the offwidth

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Laybacking the Harding Slot on toprope. I attempted to lead the pitch like this because I hated being inside the squeeze chimney. I should have been a little more prudent with my rope.

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Underclings:

Is that undercling just a bit too big? Try stuffing your knee in the crack. The technique is not just for sport climbing. The University Wall in Squamish features a number of offset wide cracks and kneebars. The Enduro Corner on the Salathe, which many people layback and stem, can be dumbed down by kneebars. Underclinging and laybacking  provides a great way to ascend the rock but kneebarring can offer a more static and arm saving way to get up the route. Learn the skill through sport climbing and apply it to granite.

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Walker kneebarring his way up the University Wall

Slabs:

Are the holds way too far apart? Try dynoing! Actually, I’m kidding. There’s no good option to get up a smooth granite slab other than to use your feet. But if you plan on campusing up a Yosemite slab, let me know. I’ll make you a YouTube sensation.

Better Know a Setter: Zach Wright

They're up with the sun, chain coffee-drinking and working hard to bring you the routes you love to send, project, and crush. 'Touchstone Routesetting' is an industry term for excellence, and each member of the crew brings a little somethin' somethin' to the team. In our ongoing segment, Better Know a Setter, we bring you a closer look at what makes 'em tick. In this weeks installment, we sat down with our summer setter, Zach Wright. Zach returns to school this fall, but will be wielding a drill again in 2015. 

unnamed-6How long have you been route setting?

I started setting for Touchstone at the beginning of this summer. Before that, when I worked desk at The Studio, I would finagle my way into setting a boulder problem here and there when the setters came around.

How did you get into route setting?

Before I worked for Touchstone, I coached a competitive climbing team, so imagining/training competition style movement was part of my job. Getting to see the routesetting at the national level was always inspiring; there's a level of aesthetics, hold selection, and movement variety you rarely see in commercial gyms. Being exposed to that level of routesetting and working with a competitive team made me want to try my hand at creating the routes, rather than just consuming them.

What is your favorite gym to set at and why?

LA Boulders. They have the best hold selection and the best walls of any gym I've set at.

What are you route setting pet peeves?

That moment where the bolt is too short, and then the T-nut is stripped, and I left my drill on the ground, and my tape won't tear quite right, and my tape angles are off, and none of my moves are forced, and I missed my grade, and my route is a turd.

What is in your route setting bag right now?

Several beers, a pint of gelato, an episode of Breaking Bad, a puppy and 8 hours of sleep.

What inspires your routes?

Mega-slappin' beats, Gregor Pierce's winning smile, caffeine, the weekend.

unnamed-7What is your favorite memory setting with the Touchstone Crew?

My first time setting Pipeworks. It was my 5th day on the job and I ended up having to set the steepest line out of the arch. I had never set on a steep wall in my life. Basically I struggled harder getting through that arch than on any climb or day of work in my life. I distinctly remember getting stuck in an aid bolt in the roof, and I'm there and struggling and trying to like, lift my bag with one arm and get myself out of the bolt with my other arm, and I'm just spinning in the roof and I'm like “Literally I'm gonna puke in this roof, 40 ft. off the ground and then pass out.” But I didn't. I made it through, eventually. Then I went home and drank beer and ate gelato and passed out at like 8 PM.

Where is your favorite place to climb outside?

The bouldering areas near Truckee are pretty dope, and of course Bishop is rad in the winter. But I'm also psyched to hit up Mortar and session with some friends and then hit the skatepark or something. They're all fun for their own reasons.

How many burritos do you eat every week?

No burritos. I rock the Berkeley Bowl specialty sandos. The turkey club panini is on point, I basically live off of those.

How many cups of coffee?

2 espressos minimum to get out the door in the morning, then however much I need to be like, a functional human being for the rest of the day. And hella kombucha, cause I like to stay cultured.

What is your advice for aspiring setters?

Routesetting gets easier once it stops being so damn hard. Also, don't take yourself too seriously. Seriously.

 

Moon on Blackwater: How to send your outdoor project

Ryan Moon stepped on the granite edge, curling his fingers on polished granite. The Ironworks employee crimped his way to a bulge. The sequence above stumped him. He went right hand. Then left. He fought the crux and the lactic acid in his forearms. A few minutes later, Bay area hardman Jordan Shackelford stepped up to the crux. Their different climbing styles and knowledge of the route led to a big difference in outcomes.

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The Squamish Select Rockclimbing guide lists Blackwater, a 5.12a at Murrin Park’s Petryifying Wall, as one of the top 100 routes in the Sea to Sky corridor. With amazing granite edges on a vertical wall, the climb features technical climbing and well spaced bolts. The initial section involves pumpy edges to a difficult polished crux, a hard redpoint move and then cruiser jugs to the anchors. 

JordanBlackwater1.1

Ryan ended up hanging on a bolt below the crux. He deciphered the difficult moves then climbed through to the anchor. On his way down, he felt the crux holds again. Ryan usually climbs routes a lot before heading on a route climbing trip but he wanted to focus on bouldering for this trip.

Jordan Blackwater 2

Jordan Shackelford recently returned from Ten Sleep, where he had been climbing on a number of technical routes. Jordan’s endurance helped him greatly when he started climbing. He also received helped from the Beta Fairy, who hung on a rope next to the route and gave guidance on which holds to grab.

Jordan climbed faster to the crux than Ryan and arrived less pumped. With knowledge of the crux holds and encouragement from the Beta Fairy, he grabbed the correct holds and fought through the difficult sequence. At the redpoint crux, he piano keyed his fingers onto a granite sidepull and managed to pull out a solid ascent. Good thing the Beta Fairy brought the camera because Jordan brought the Flash.

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A few minutes later, Ryan attempted the route again. One the ground, he practiced the crux sequence, remembering the moves so he could execute them well. With a dialed sequence and experience from his previous attempt, he climbed faster and arrived to the crux less pumped. Before the redpoint crux, he shook out and moved through the difficult upper section with authority.  

Moon Blackwater 4

Having the sequence figured out, climbing faster and having the draws hanging all made the ascent much easier for Ryan. Jordan’s route fitness and the Beta Fairy helped him succeed. Take some tips from these two Bay area hardman and send your next project.

Tips on Learning to Trad Climb

Traditional climbing offers the chance to scale large formations, to take a set of gear and climb to the top without the need of another party establishing the route. It is one of the most exciting types of climbing- summits, self reliance and huge formations. Trad climbing can be very intimidating though. There’s a lot involved and when many experienced climbers start placing gear they feel like they’re learning how to rock climb all over again. The climbing requires a significant amount of technique and finding adequate protection gear can be challenging. There are a few things you can do to make the transition to trad easier.

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Find a good route

Many traditional routes have run outs, difficult moves and hard to place gear. Do a bit of research and find a route with straightforward placements and climbing within your limits. Leading 5.10 sport may rarely translates well to 5.10 traditional routes. Set the bar low and move up.

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Practice the gear on toprope

This tactic stays true for routes of all grades. Bay area rock star, Walker Emerson climbed Flight of the Challenger, a 5.12c in Squamish, but practiced placing the gear on toprope first. He fiddled with the cams, deciding where he would need the small gear and where he should save the bigger pieces. After he dialed out all the gear placements on toprope, he lead the route.  

Climb with an experienced partner

Learning from a veteran trad climber makes and enormous difference. They can help you make the decision between using a cam or placing a stopper. They can evaluate your gear placements. If things go array, they can also escape the belay and provide instruction on how to retreat safely.

Pang 4

Be prepared

Wear the correct type of shoes. Bouldering and sport climbing shoes are significantly different than trad shoes. Your feet will be happier and you’ll be able to climb better with appropriate footwear. Minimize the amount of gear dangling from your harness. Keep the experience as simple as possible. Climb in the shade on hot sunny days to maximize friction. Head to the sun only if it’s cold outside.

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Have Fun

Trad climbing can be scary. There’s a ton of new things to learn- the gear, the climbing, the anchors, etc. Be relaxed and have fun. It will make things go way smoother. 

Past blog entries can be found at  http://touchstoneclimbing.blogspot.com/

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